We’re making Beyond free 1

Beyond mascot

At Beyond, we have been building a consumer brand for after life services since 2015.

Our mission is to overhaul a sector which has been left behind by digital progress, where the consumer has been disenfranchised of any power, choice or equity by market forces, and incumbent players desperate to maintain the status quo.

We believe that showing easily comparable online pricing for funerals is crucial to making the market fair for consumers and we’re proud that in the last 4 years, we’ve helped over 40% of funeral directors do so, (some unwillingly) on our price comparison website (PCW).

But 40% isn’t enough.

Where we can, we give back. Our digital will service was free for over a year, resulting in thousands of low-income users making wills and leaving legacy gifts to charities.

And in that vein, I am pleased to announce that today we are making our PCW entirely free for funeral directors (it has always been free for consumers).

  • All funeral directors can now maintain a profile and pricing on Beyond at no cost.
  • We will not rank any price-transparent funeral director over another. Pari Passu.
  • All website and phone enquiries will go through to the funeral director.
  • Our other services for funeral directors such as online obituaries and financing remain free

By providing this pro bono service, we hope to encourage the remaining 800 Dignity PLC, 1,000 Coop, 200 Funeral Partners and 2,000 independent funeral branches, who don’t currently show easily comparable pricing online, to take that positive step.

We urge them to take control of their profiles, to enter their pricing, edit their own business descriptions, and stand alongside the growing minority who are leading the industry away from obfuscation towards price transparency.

There’s really no legitimate reason not to.

Ian Strang

Beyond (Founder & CEO)

 

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Beyond ‘Let’s Talk About Death’ Campaign Wins Drum Award 0

Beyond win Drum Out of Home Awards

Season’s greetings!

Celebrations are underway at the Beyond office this week, as we’ve been given an early Christmas present: a prestigious marketing award!

Our summer ‘Let’s Talk About Death’ campaign has won the Drum Creative Out of Home Award in the ‘Viral’ category, with the judges praising our success in driving a conversation about death against the odds.

Let’s talk about death…

Released mid-July, our ‘Let’s Talk About Death’ campaign used a little black humour to break through the silence that surrounds anything death-related. You can check out all of the ads here.

Rejected by TFL, the ‘Let’s Talk About Death’ campaign found new life on social media. The ‘banned’ ads were then quickly picked up by press across the world. We appeared in print, on TV and on the radio, sparking an energetic debate about whether and how we should talk about funeral services.

As we’ve said before, we couldn’t be more delighted with the results of this campaign. We strongly believe that to drive positive change in this industry – whether that be price transparency, or a better approach to after life services overall – we as a society need to be talking about death.

This campaign achieved that. And, as an added bonus, thousands of people have created their will online with us for free, raising several hundred thousand pounds for charity through legacy gifts.

Beyond win Drum Out of Home Award 2018Our CEO, Ian Strang, has this to say:

“When something is taboo, as with death, it creates an environment where bad actors can operate. And our fear of engaging on the subject – creating that shared code of silence – allows predators to rip us off. We pay too much for funerals, funeral plans and wills because we don’t feel able to shop around.

“Following the controversy, we were overwhelmed by the support we received from the public and this award gives a further stamp of approval from the advertising industry to our campaign.”

Thank you for your support

As gratifying as awards are, the most rewarding outcome from this campaign has been the support we’ve received both from those in the industry and the general public.

We’ve heard from independent funeral directors, who appreciated that only by breaking the silence around funerals could we advocate for those in this industry who offer the best value and service to their customers.

We’ve also heard from non-profits – those who campaign for the same fairness and transparency we aim to provide.

And we’ve heard from bereaved people themselves, who stood up for us and fought for their right to know that services like ours exist. This support has meant the world to us.

In the end, 76% of those who saw our ads agreed that they didn’t deserve to be hidden away: that a conversation about death is a conversation worth having. To all those people, thank you. And let’s keep that conversation going.

Government Probate Fee Hikes to Hit Bereaved Families Hard 0

Family holds up piggy bank spilling out coins

In a controversial move, the government will be changing their official probate fees from £215 to as much as £6,000 for some bereaved families.

At the moment, families who need a grant of representation to settle the estate of someone who has died pay £215 in government probate fees, or £155 if they have professional help. Estates worth less than £5,000 are exempt.

Under the new fee structure, families settling an estate worth more than £50,000 will pay between £250 and £6,000, depending on the size of the estate.

Opponents of the new probate fees have called them a “stealth tax” that will hit vulnerable bereaved families hard.

However, the government has said that due to the higher threshold for fee payment, an extra 25,000 families each year won’t pay anything at all. 80% of those who will need to pay will face fees of £750 or less, with a maximum of 0.5% taken from any estate.

“Fair and more progressive”

In a written announcement, Parliamentary Under-Secretary for the Ministry of Justice Lucy Frazer MP said: “This new banded fee model represents a fair and more progressive way to pay for probate services compared to the current flat fee and reflects our commitment to protecting access to justice by ensuring we have a properly funded and resourced courts system.”

She also claimed that there were “several options” for families to fund the new higher fees and those who struggle to pay may be able to apply to the Lord Chancellor to remit the cost under exceptional circumstances.

“£10 million” in charitable income lost

As well as families, the change in probate fees could also have a significant impact on charities, which often rely heavily on the ‘legacy’ money that people leave to them in wills. The Institute of Legacy Management estimates that the higher charges could cost charities as much as £10 million a year in lost income.

Matthew Lagden, chief executive of the ILM, said that “The government’s own impact assessment acknowledges that the current fees cover the average costs of making a grant of probate, so we are clear that this is a stealth tax, which will be borne in part by charities,”

“We are also very concerned that the government’s impact assessment dismisses the costs to the charity sector as ‘not expected to be substantial’, when the £10m lost to this tax would fund vital services across England and Wales.”

What are probate fees for?

When someone dies, the executor of their will (or if there’s no will, their next of kin) needs to sort out their legal and financial affairs. Their money, property, assets and belongings all need to be passed on to the right people.

To access things like bank accounts, change property deeds, or transfer shares belonging to the person who has died, a grant of representation may be needed. This is an official document that states that a person has the legal right to settle the estate.

To set the grant up, the HM Courts and Tribunals Service charges a probate fee – so called because the kind of grant of representation you get is called a grant of probate if there’s a will. It’s called a letter of administration if not.

On average, 51% of estates in England and Wales can only be settled with a grant of representation.

How are the fees changing?

The current probate fee is a flat rate of £215 charged to DIY applicants, or £155 for those using professional help. It’s the same for estates of all sizes.

The new probate fees will be based on how much the estate is worth in total:

  • <£50,000: no fee
  • £50,000 – £300,000: £250
  • £300,000 – £500,000: £750
  • £500,000 – £1 million: £2,500
  • £1 million – £1.6 million: £4,000
  • £1.6 million – £2 million: £5,000
  • £2 million or more: £6,000

When will the higher probate fees come in?

The new fee structure will apply from April 2019 on.