5 Ingenious Wills Created Mostly For Revenge 0

A skeleton takes his revenge

Death! Suffering! Elaborate old-timey insults! Sure, you can make a will for nice, kind reasons. Support your family. Choose a home for your cat. Give to charities. But why do that, when you can settle some old scores? Stay tuned for five wills that served up a revenge as cold as the grave…

1) The legacy of bitterness

Wellington boots or wellington burts
Unverified sighting of Wellington Burt in the wild.

Michigan lumber tycoon and owner of a pun-worthy name, Wellington Burt died in 1919 with a hefty fortune under his belt (or should we say, tucked into his Wellington Burts?). A multimillionaire philanthropist in life, Burt was expected to make his family and his town very wealthy indeed upon his death.

But it wasn’t to be: reputedly smarting from a nasty family spat, Burt instead left the bulk of his fortune in a trust fund, not to be opened until 21 years after the death of his last grandchild. 

As the years went by, Burt’s six children, seven grandchildren, six great-grandchildren and 11 great-great grandchildren have all died without seeing a penny. Meanwhile, the trust fund has grown to an estimated $100m. Relatives who finally inherited in 2011 described it as a “legacy of bitterness,” having watched family members pass away still fruitlessly hoping to claim that fortune.

Heinrich Heine on his deathbed
Heinrich Heine reflecting on his choices.

2) The final regret

For 15 years, German essayist and poet Heinrich Heine had a very volatile relationship with his wife, Mathilde. But when he fell ill, she stayed at his bedside to the very end – and received a somewhat ambiguous reward.

Heine left Mathilde a legacy, alright, but only if she remarried. His reasoning? “Because then, at least one man will regret my death.” Ouch.

3) The father-in-law’s revenge

Son-in-laws: can’t live with them, can’t guilt someone into putting shelves up around the house without them. In 1908, Garvey P. White’s used his will to take a parting shot at his daughter’s unfortunate husband:

“Before anything else is to be done, 50 cents is to be given to my son-in-law to enable himself to buy a good strong rope with which to hang himself, and thus rid mankind of one of the most infamous scoundrels that ever roamed this broad land or lived outside a penitentiary.”

One has to wonder what the son-in-law did to deserve it.

Bath Abbey
Not pictured: vengeful bellringers.

4) The bells, the bells

Another disgruntled husband here: Colonel Charles Nash used his will to leave an annuity of $50 to the bellringers of Bath Abbey. 

But there were conditions: the bellringers had to clang out a mournful funerary toll on the anniversary of his marriage. They also had to ring the bells merrily on the anniversary of his death – celebrating his liberation from married life.

5) The deadly legacy

In the wrong hands, a will can be a dangerous thing. One Munich-based gentleman had a seemingly harmless stipulation in his will: the wake had to be held in an upstairs room of his house. 

But when family and friends arrived and gathered around the coffin, the entire floor came down – killing almost everyone present. It later turned out that the man had painstakingly sawed most of the way through the beams of his house. Perhaps he didn’t want to be seen dead in their company.

Beyond mascot takes n otes while sitting in a chair.Make your own vengeful will today

Have your own score to settle? You can make a will today on Beyond in just 15 minutes. It costs just £90, or £135 if you and your partner would like to plan your vengeance together. Start making your will today.

Don’t forget! Pay 20% more for your vengeful will using the offer code VENGEANCEISMINE at checkout – you big meanie.

 

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How to Plan a Funeral For a Football Fan 0

football fan funeral

As personal funeral services become more common and people begin to step away from the traditional black dress, hearse and hymns approach that we’ve come to associate with funerals, it’s interesting to look at how hobbies, interests and passions have become more of a focal point. A perfect example of this phenomenon is football.

 

Football is a sport that plays a major role in many people’s lives across the country, so it’s only natural that some families choose to incorporate a football theme into a loved one’s funeral service. Here we take a look at how to plan a funeral for a football fan and what you can to do to make it a really special occasion.

 

Wake at a stadium

More and more football clubs are beginning to offer their hospitality facilities to fans for use as a wake and memorial service venue. Many offer a catered service where friends, family and well-wishers can gather together to celebrate the life of a loved one in a meaningful space. Though this is by no means an exhaustive list, clubs such as Brighton and Hove Albion, Everton Football Club and Norwich City Football Club, all have spaces to hire for this purpose. If you want to remember the deceased somewhere they enjoyed visiting, there could be no better place than their own club’s ground.

 

Match day programme

It’s usually possible to contact those in charge of producing your local club’s match day programme to see if they’re able to dedicate a little space to the memory of the deceased. Often, they’re able to edit in a short message, include a photograph or even print a submitted piece of writing that details the important connection the deceased had with their club. It’s also possible that they’ll be able to suggest alternative ways you can honour their memory or put you in touch with other management figures at the club.

 how to plan a funeral for a football fan

 

Transport and flowers

One of the more usual ways of personalising a funeral is by hiring different types of vehicle to transport the casket to the service. There are an enormous number of companies offering such a service, but Vintage Lorry Funerals stand out for their ability to provide bespoke funeral transport for a football fan. Though they theme their beautiful 1950 Leyland Beaver in a number of different ways, they often transport caskets backed by large football flower arrangements in the colours of a favourite team.

 

A memorial match

If the deceased loved to play football and was part of a five-a-side or full eleven-a-side football team, you may want to see if you can organise a match in honour of their memory. Even if it’s just friends and family, it’s a great way to remember the deceased and what they loved doing most. If you want to take it a step further, you could organise a fundraiser for a charity that was close to the deceased’s heart, arranging food and drinks for after the match and asking for donations.

How to Save for Retirement 0

save for retirement

There are a number of different ways to save for retirement and which option is best for you will largely depend on personal circumstance. However, most experts suggest a combination of saving techniques as the most sensible approach to take.

 

While straightforward savings accounts give you easier access to your funds in case of an emergency, pensions and investments can result in greater returns. It’s also important to think about the ways you can mitigate against rising costs and larger expenditures as you get older. Committing to a funeral plan is a great example of one way you can avoid paying out large amounts once you hit retirement. With this in mind we take a look at a few of the key ways you can save for retirement.

save for retirement

Straightforward savings

The simplest, though perhaps not always the best, way of saving for retirement is using a traditional savings account and ensuring you put a set amount of money away each month. There are a number of savings accounts to choose from, including ISAs, instant access ISAs, notice accounts and National Savings accounts, so do your research and work out what type of account is best for you. Make sure you think about how easily you want to be able to access your savings, how much interest you want to be earning and whether there are any additional features you require before signing up.

 

Investment

Though there’s always a little bit of risk involved in investing your savings, it can result in much larger returns on your money. If you have experience of the financial markets and feel comfortable making investment decisions on your own, there’s no need to look for outside help. However, if you feel you could benefit from some guidance, it may be best to talk to investment specialists. Though they will either charge a fee or take a percentage of your returns, it is probably a more secure way of investing your hard-earned cash.

 

Pensions

Pensions are an important mechanism for ensuring you have enough money to last you during retirement. Though everyone has a small state pension, most people pay into a private scheme that’s either operated by their employer or a private company. It’s worth noting that you have no obligation to pay into your employer’s pension scheme, and sometimes it is worth keeping your options open. There’s a wide range of pension schemes to choose between, so it’s worth taking the time and effort to explore your options before beginning your payments. Look for an established provider with an excellent reputation to ensure your money isn’t mishandled in any way.

 

Funeral Plan

Finally, it’s a good idea to look at ways you can minimise expenditure later in life to ensure your savings go further. One of the key ways of doing this is by looking into funeral plans. Though the benefits of such schemes vary depending on the company you go with, plans like the Beyond Open Plan tie the cost of your funeral to current price levels. This can mean enormous savings when you consider the fact that funeral costs are expected to rise to an astonishing £10,203 within the next 12 years, while the average funeral comes in at just £3,800 now. By ensuring you’re prepared and taking action now, you could make your savings stretch a lot further.