What is Death Positivity? 0

Death positivity is an attitude towards life and death that emphasises the importance of open and honest discussion about death and a re-familiarisation with end of life processes. Rather than treating death as something that should be hidden away and not talked or thought about, death positivity argues that individuals should take a more open approach to death, break down the taboo surrounding the topic and not shy away from the difficulties of thinking and talking about it. In recent years, death positivity has become increasingly popular, even solidifying into a burgeoning movement of activists and practitioners that hope to spread the message about death positivity and what it can do.

 

What death positivity is not

Death positivity does not involve the glorification or trivialisation of death, nor does it consider it a good thing. Instead, it preaches that death is an inevitable part of life that we all will experience at some point. It does not aim to force people toward a certain perspective or world view, but does encourage an open approach toward the subject of death. Death positivity is not associated with any single organisation or religious authority and can be considered more of an attitude than a doctrine or rigid set of beliefs.

 

Why is death positivity important?

For many, the taboo surrounding death prevents them from openly discussing their feelings or grieving in a way that suits or benefits them. This taboo means that we often hide death away and don’t confront it directly – an attitude that can have profoundly negative effects on our ability to make essential end of life choices and ensure everything is prepared for someone’s eventual passing. The fear surrounding death can lead to individuals bottling up emotions and thoughts that really do need to be released, potentially making a tough time even more difficult.

 

While everyone must be allowed to grieve in their own way, death positivity is about removing barriers to healthy grief; with the intended consequence that people are able to deal with the challenges and trials of bereavement in a constructive way.

 

Many also find that choosing to take on a more positive attitude when it comes to mortality can liberate them from anxiety when it comes to their own death, and as a result feel that they are free to make the most of their finite lives.

 positive attitude to death

Why is death positivity emerging now?

The attitudes reflected in the philosophy of death positivity are hardly new ideas. They are ideas that are re-emerging now as a response to modern society’s detachment from death. As medical treatment and methods have improved over the years, death has intruded less on our everyday lives and we are not faced with its reality as regularly as past societies would have been. This has resulted in a detachment from the reality of death and a desire to avoid it as a topic. Similarly, the way in which we respond to death (our end of life customs and traditions), have changed significantly, limiting our exposure to death even further. The death positivity movement has emerged in an attempt to provide some perspective on death and to encourage greater interaction with the issue.

 

What can you do?

Although there are a number of organisations, such as The Order of the Good Death, which provide a more focused outlet for the ideas of death positivity, it’s more akin to a state of mind that can be adopted by individuals at any time than it is to a movement which you can join. You can start by beginning to talk with loved ones about their end of life wishes and asking a number of important questions. For instance: Do you have a will? How do you want to spend your last moments? What kind of funeral would you want? What do you think happens after death? These are a just a few ideas but are a good place to start if you wish to open up discussions about death. There are also death cafes around the country that allow individuals to talk openly about mortality. If you or a loved one is approaching end of life, you may wish to enlist the services of an end of life doula. A doula can often be an enormous source of comfort for someone who is unwell.

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How to Plan a Funeral For a Football Fan 0

football fan funeral

As personal funeral services become more common and people begin to step away from the traditional black dress, hearse and hymns approach that we’ve come to associate with funerals, it’s interesting to look at how hobbies, interests and passions have become more of a focal point. A perfect example of this phenomenon is football.

 

Football is a sport that plays a major role in many people’s lives across the country, so it’s only natural that some families choose to incorporate a football theme into a loved one’s funeral service. Here we take a look at how to plan a funeral for a football fan and what you can to do to make it a really special occasion.

 

Wake at a stadium

More and more football clubs are beginning to offer their hospitality facilities to fans for use as a wake and memorial service venue. Many offer a catered service where friends, family and well-wishers can gather together to celebrate the life of a loved one in a meaningful space. Though this is by no means an exhaustive list, clubs such as Brighton and Hove Albion, Everton Football Club and Norwich City Football Club, all have spaces to hire for this purpose. If you want to remember the deceased somewhere they enjoyed visiting, there could be no better place than their own club’s ground.

 

Match day programme

It’s usually possible to contact those in charge of producing your local club’s match day programme to see if they’re able to dedicate a little space to the memory of the deceased. Often, they’re able to edit in a short message, include a photograph or even print a submitted piece of writing that details the important connection the deceased had with their club. It’s also possible that they’ll be able to suggest alternative ways you can honour their memory or put you in touch with other management figures at the club.

 how to plan a funeral for a football fan

 

Transport and flowers

One of the more usual ways of personalising a funeral is by hiring different types of vehicle to transport the casket to the service. There are an enormous number of companies offering such a service, but Vintage Lorry Funerals stand out for their ability to provide bespoke funeral transport for a football fan. Though they theme their beautiful 1950 Leyland Beaver in a number of different ways, they often transport caskets backed by large football flower arrangements in the colours of a favourite team.

 

A memorial match

If the deceased loved to play football and was part of a five-a-side or full eleven-a-side football team, you may want to see if you can organise a match in honour of their memory. Even if it’s just friends and family, it’s a great way to remember the deceased and what they loved doing most. If you want to take it a step further, you could organise a fundraiser for a charity that was close to the deceased’s heart, arranging food and drinks for after the match and asking for donations.

How to Save for Retirement 0

save for retirement

There are a number of different ways to save for retirement and which option is best for you will largely depend on personal circumstance. However, most experts suggest a combination of saving techniques as the most sensible approach to take.

 

While straightforward savings accounts give you easier access to your funds in case of an emergency, pensions and investments can result in greater returns. It’s also important to think about the ways you can mitigate against rising costs and larger expenditures as you get older. Committing to a funeral plan is a great example of one way you can avoid paying out large amounts once you hit retirement. With this in mind we take a look at a few of the key ways you can save for retirement.

save for retirement

Straightforward savings

The simplest, though perhaps not always the best, way of saving for retirement is using a traditional savings account and ensuring you put a set amount of money away each month. There are a number of savings accounts to choose from, including ISAs, instant access ISAs, notice accounts and National Savings accounts, so do your research and work out what type of account is best for you. Make sure you think about how easily you want to be able to access your savings, how much interest you want to be earning and whether there are any additional features you require before signing up.

 

Investment

Though there’s always a little bit of risk involved in investing your savings, it can result in much larger returns on your money. If you have experience of the financial markets and feel comfortable making investment decisions on your own, there’s no need to look for outside help. However, if you feel you could benefit from some guidance, it may be best to talk to investment specialists. Though they will either charge a fee or take a percentage of your returns, it is probably a more secure way of investing your hard-earned cash.

 

Pensions

Pensions are an important mechanism for ensuring you have enough money to last you during retirement. Though everyone has a small state pension, most people pay into a private scheme that’s either operated by their employer or a private company. It’s worth noting that you have no obligation to pay into your employer’s pension scheme, and sometimes it is worth keeping your options open. There’s a wide range of pension schemes to choose between, so it’s worth taking the time and effort to explore your options before beginning your payments. Look for an established provider with an excellent reputation to ensure your money isn’t mishandled in any way.

 

Funeral Plan

Finally, it’s a good idea to look at ways you can minimise expenditure later in life to ensure your savings go further. One of the key ways of doing this is by looking into funeral plans. Though the benefits of such schemes vary depending on the company you go with, plans like the Beyond Open Plan tie the cost of your funeral to current price levels. This can mean enormous savings when you consider the fact that funeral costs are expected to rise to an astonishing £10,203 within the next 12 years, while the average funeral comes in at just £3,800 now. By ensuring you’re prepared and taking action now, you could make your savings stretch a lot further.