Pop Music For Funerals 0

pop music for funerals

Music is a great way to evoke feelings and memories attached to a particular time, place or person and is often used to personalise funerals, to ensure the service is relevant to the deceased and to represent something of their life. For those who have grown up with it, no genre of music is more evocative of good times than pop music. Here we take a look at nine of the best pieces of pop music for funerals and try to suggest a song for every type of individual or service. Below you’ll find three tearjerkers, three more uplifting pieces, and three alternative, funnier examples of pop music for funerals. Feel free to comment below with any songs that we’ve missed out.

 

Three tearjerkers

Over the Rainbow – Eva Cassidy

Eva Cassidy’s haunting vocals and beautifully minimal guitar playing make for an extremely emotional experience when it’s played at funerals. This magnificent cover has become an increasingly popular choice of funeral music in recent years and is sure to remain one for the foreseeable future.

 

Nothing Compares to You – Sinead O’Connor

If you really want to emphasise the unique role the deceased played in the lives of those mourners gathered at the service, there’s no better choice than O’Connor’s classic, Nothing Compares To You.

 

Wish You Were Here – Pink Floyd

If the deceased’s interest in music veered away from traditional pop tracks towards prog or rock, Wish You Were Here might prove a good option for the funeral. This sad song, backed by wonderful instrumentalists, expresses exactly what many will be thinking and feeling as they gather together to mourn their loss.

 

Three uplifting tracks

My Way – Frank Sinatra

A fitting tribute to anyone who made the most of the short time we’re allotted on this planet, Sinatra’s My Way is an uplifting track that ensures the focus of the funeral service is on the deceased’s life and not their death.

 

You’ll Never Walk Alone – Gerry and the Pacemakers

Though it may be heavily associated with Liverpool FC and its supporters, this song sends out a positive message of companionship, reassurance and unity at a time when these qualities are desperately needed.

 

See You Again – Wiz Khalifa

This modern entry was written for the Fast and the Furious franchise as a tribute to its protagonist and star, Paul Walker, upon his death in 2015. Unlike a number of other contemporary tracks popular at funerals, it tries hard to ensure its message is an uplifting one.

 

Three for a laugh

Always Look on the Bright Side of Life – Eric Idle

Most people will know this as the song that closes the classic Monty Python film Life of Brian, but it’s also quickly becoming a firm favourite among those hoping to get a few chuckles out of those gathered at a memorial service. It also serves as a brilliant reminder to stay positive at a time when it can be difficult to do so.

 

Smoke Gets in Your Eyes – The Platters

If you’ve decided on cremation and want to bring a little humour to what would otherwise be a serious and sombre day, there’s possibly no better choice of music than The Platter’s Smoke Gets In Your Eyes. Though some may consider it to be overstepping the mark somewhat, it can also help to raise a smile among those present at the service.

 

Going Deeper Underground – Jamiroquai

A good choice for those that are going to be buried, Jamiroquai’s funky, disco-infused track will go down a storm among those who enjoy a little black humour.

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Catholic Funeral Customs 0

catholic funeral customs

The Catholic Church is one of oldest religious institutions in the world and boasts a worldwide following of around 1.29 billion people. It has had a major impact on western thought, society, culture and politics, and has shaped the way many individuals think about death. Here, we take a look at the religion’s beliefs concerning death and explore the Catholic funeral customs.

Many of our funeral directors cater for Catholic funeral services. Find and contact a funeral director near you today.

Catholic beliefs

Catholics believe that each person’s soul is immortal and that, at the moment of death, the body and soul separate. While the body, devoid of the spirit that animated it, begins to decompose, the soul is taken to be judged by God. It is then either granted eternal life in Heaven or damned to an eternity in Hell.

However, not all of those granted access to Heaven are quite ready to pass through the pearly gates. Those who have lived a just enough life to reach Heaven but that are still due punishment for some as yet accounted for sin, spend time in Purgatory. Purgatory is a temporary state that purges the soul of sin and fully prepares an individual for Heaven.

catholic funeral customs

Catholic funeral customs

Catholicism maintains its own distinct traditions that differentiate it from other Christian traditions. When death is imminent, a priest is usually called to administer the dying person’s last rites. Traditionally, there are three stages to a Catholic funeral. The vigil – where friends and family gather to watch over the deceased’s body or cremated ashes and pray that their soul reaches heaven. The funeral mass – which takes place at the church and involves the casket or urn being carried to the front of the church and a memorial service led by the local priest. Finally, there is the burial – where the remains of the deceased are taken to their burial place and a priest commits them to the Earth.

Etiquette and other customs

catholic funeral customs

Catholicism is a large and widespread religion that can differ from region to region and that is also open to doctrinal differences. This means that what’s acceptable in a Catholic funeral on one occasion, may not be on another. For instance, in some Catholic communities, cremation is not acceptable. However, in recent years, Catholic religious authorities have shifted their position and many churches won’t have a problem with cremation.

The Catholic Church holds no objection to organ donation, as mainstream religious doctrine supports the idea that once brain function ceases, the soul has departed the body. Likewise, embalming the deceased’s body is common practice if a vigil is to be held and the Church is in no way opposed to embalming.

As a non-Catholic attending a Catholic funeral, you can take part in the entire ceremony but won’t be expected to take Holy Communion, as it’s a practice reserved for those of Catholic faith. After the funeral service, it is common practice for a less formal memorial event to take place at a relative’s home, a pub or another local venue. However, such an event is not a formal part of the service and not all Catholic funerals will end with one.

5 More Things to Do When You Retire 0

write your memoirs

While some reach retirement and wish to put their feet up and enjoy a well-earned break, others like to seek new enthralling experiences. Regardless of which camp you fall into, the chances are that they’ll be a number of things you’ve always wanted to try, or to return to. So if you’re retired, or are on the verge of retirement, and are seeking some inspiration on how you could fill your days, here are 5 more things to do when you retire – following on from on first list which you can find here.

 

Of course you should always give consideration to your own practical needs too, which is why you may want to consider a funeral plan to ensure your family isn’t faced with a financial burden. As the previous selection had an international flavour and involved a lot of travelling and sightseeing, we’ve decided to orientate this one around activities that are a little closer to home.

 

  1. Get active

Though lots of people want to slow down and take things easy when they get to retirement, there are quite a few who take it as opportunity to do a little more physical activity. While work commitments may have prevented you from jogging, swimming, cycling or working out when they were employed, retirement allows you to get active and perhaps tackle some of the physical challenges you didn’t have time for before. Whether it’s training for a half marathon, trying to beat your personal best in the pool or taking up a new sport, there are numerous ways you can work on maintaining your fitness into old age.
get active when you retire

 

  1. Give something back to the community

 

It’s often the case that individuals reach a certain age and feel that they’d like to give something back to the local community. In many cases, they’ve lived and worked in a community that has seen them through the good times and the bad, and, with time on their hands, they’re now in the position to help out. This can manifest itself in a variety of ways, including helping out with the local junior football team, becoming a Brown Owl in a Brownies group or by volunteering at a social centre.

 

  1. Write your memoirs

One of the activities that appears most frequently on bucket lists is writing a book. While you may or may not have it in you to write an entire work of fiction, you’ll definitely have something to say about your own life. The great thing about writing a memoir is that, even if no one else reads it, you produce a written record of the highs and lows of your life to pass on down to your children and grandchildren.

  1. write your memoirsLearn a foreign language

It’s never too late to learn something new and picking up a language can be one of the most satisfying and enjoyable things you’ll ever do. Whether you just want to get by while on holiday or are aiming for complete fluency, learning another language is life changing in a number of ways. Not only does it radically alter the way you communicate with others, it will also change the way you view your own language.

 

  1. Grow your own food

Finally, many of those yet to reach retirement dream of the day they’ll be able to spend their mornings pottering around their allotment, tending to their plants and vegetables. Growing your own food is an absolute pleasure and is incredibly rewarding. Being able to watch a plant grow all the way from seed to edible vegetable is a fascinating and tasty experience that will keep you beautifully busy for years on end.

grow your own vegetables when you retire