If you’re struggling to find adequate words to represent the way you feel about the loss of a loved one, poetry can be an excellent place to find inspiration. The best poets express how many of us feel in beautiful and succinct ways, giving us an opportunity to recognise that we’re not alone in feeling grief or despair, and that there are others out there who have felt the same way or thought the same things.

 

When selecting funeral poems for a father, it’s important to think about what that person meant to you and what a father figure represents. They are someone that cares and loves for their children, wife and entire family and that plays an important role in shaping the lives of the kids they raise. Here we take a look at a few of the best funeral poems for a father and explore why they resonate with readers.

funeral poems for a father

 

‘Remember the way he lived’ funeral poems

The first poem is a simple piece of work that expresses exactly how many people feel about their fathers. It’s a poem about how irreplaceable a father can be and how they’ll be remembered forever as a unique, caring and loving individual.

 

Dad

We’ll always remember

that special smile,

that caring heart,

that warm embrace,

you always gave us.

You being there

for Mom and us,

through good and bad times,

no matter what.

We’ll always remember

you Dad because

they’ll never be another one

to replace you in our hearts,

and the love we will always

have for you.

 

This poem takes a look at what it means to be a successful man and what kind of life the good man will have had. It’s a short and simple poem that many will be able to relate to and often gets a good response at funerals.

 

A Successful Man

That man is a success –

who has lived well, laughed often and loved much;

who has gained the respect of intelligent men and the love of children;

who has filled his niche and accomplished his task;

who leaves the world better than he found it;

who has never lacked appreciation of earth’s beauty or failed to express it;

who looked for the best in others and gave the best he had.

 

‘Dads who loved their children’ funeral poems

Georgia Harkness’ poem uses a giant pine tree as a metaphor for the father figure who offers a strong and secure platform on which his children can build their lives and become the people they want to be. It also touches on the idea that those that knew him will always pay tribute to him, and remember his life.

 

To My Father – Georgia Harkness

A giant pine, magnificent and old

Stood staunch against the sky and all around

Shed beauty, grace and power.

Within its fold birds safely reared their young.

The velvet ground beneath was gentle,

and the cooling shade gave cheer to passers-by.

Its towering arms a landmark stood, erect and unafraid,

As if to say, “Fear naught from life’s alarms”.

It fell one day.

Where it had dauntless stood was loneliness and void.

But men who passed paid tribute – and said,

“To know this life was good,

It left its mark on me. Its work stands fast”.

And so it lives. Such life no bonds can hold –

This giant pine, magnificent and old.

 

You Were There also focuses on the role a father plays in raising his children and the influence he has over who they become. The poem ends on a positive note, with the author saying that wherever the children or father may go, they’ll always be together in spirit.

You Were There

You were there when we took our first steps,

And went unsteadily across the floor.

You pushed and prodded: encouraged and guided,

Until our steps took us out the door…

You worry now “Are they ok?”

Is there more you could have done?

As we walk the paths of our unknown

You wonder “Where have my children gone?”

Where we are is where you have led us,

With your special love you showed us a way,

To believe in ourselves and the decisions we make.

Taking on the challenge of life day-to-day.

And where we go you can be sure,

In spirit you shall never be alone.

For where you are is what matters most to us,

Because to us that will always be home…

 

‘Gone too soon’ funeral poems for a father

Moments Before is a poem about a father being taken too soon and how those left behind can often feel like they wish they had more time with him. It has a strong rhyming pattern and the rhythm is easy to get your head round, making it a popular choice to read at funerals.

 

Moments Before – Kelly Horn

Moments before our walk that afternoon,

I realized the path ended too soon.

Not long enough to hold his hand,

this amazing person, this loving man.

Not long enough to engage his eyes

and remember his always brimming with pride.

Not long enough to stand by his side,

as he was by mine after every rough tide.

Not long enough to laugh with him still,

after every bad joke, after every tough hill.

Not long enough to walk with this man,

who has taught me to be the person I am.

Not long enough as we walked by his wife,

to thank them both for my wonderful life.

In all the walks I’ve taken in my life,

first as a girl and now as a wife,

I’ll remember that walk I took with my father

and always wish it could have been longer.

 

Our final poem is about giving thanks to a father for all the things they’ve done in the past. It focuses on the lessons they’ve passed on, the work they’ve done and the love they’ve shown, but also notes that the time father and child had together was over all too quickly.

 

Memories of Dad

I will take this special moment

To turn my thoughts to Dad

Thank him for the home he gave

For all the things we had.

 

We think about the fleeting years

Too quickly, gone for good

It seems like only yesterday

I’d go back if I could.

 

A time when Dad was always there,

No matter what the weather.

Always strong when things went wrong

He held our lives together.

 

He strived so hard from day to day

And never once complained.

With steady hands, he worked so hard

And kept the family name.

 

He taught us that hard work pays off,

You reap just what you sow.

He said that if you tend your crops,

Your field will overflow.

 

My life has been bountiful

He taught me how to give

In his firm and steadfast way

He taught me how to live.

 

Dad dwells among the angels now

He left us much too soon

He glides across a golden field

Above the harvest moon.

 

I see him in the summer rain,

He rides upon the wind

And when my path is beaten down

He picks me up again.

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